Veterinary Care in Kennesaw, Acworth, Oak Grove, Marietta and surrounding towns 3725 Cherokee Street NW • Kennesaw, GA 30144 Map Text info to phone Hospital Hours Client Reviews Shiloh Veterinary Hospital Facebook button Shiloh Veterinary Hospital Google+ button 770-426-6900 Shiloh Veterinary Hospital, Kennesaw GA
Shiloh Animal Hospital in Kennesaw

Veterinarian in Kennesaw Georgia

Shiloh Veterinary Hospital

FAQ's

After-Hours or Weekend Emergencies

We accommodate emergency appointments during normal business hours. For after-hours emergencies, call or take your pet directly to:

Cobb Veterinary Emergency & Referral Center
630 Cobb Parkway North
Marietta, GA  30062
770-424-9157
___________
Cherokee Veterinary Emergency & Referral Center
7800 Highway 92
Woodstock, GA  30189
770-924-3720

Appointment Policy

To allow ample time for all patients and scheduled surgical procedures, we operate primarily by appointment, however, walk-ins are welcome. Emergency cases shall always receive top priority, which is why occasional appointment delay is inevitable. Please realize that we make a sincere attempt to see each client on time.

Patient Arrival Policy

For your protection, and that of others, all dogs must be on a leash and properly controlled while in the waiting area or exam rooms.
All cats must be presented in an appropriate cat carrier or on a leash.

Drop Off Appointments

For your convenience, 'drop-off' appointments are available. A 'drop off' means you could bring your pet at the time that works best for you and leave him/her with us for a couple of hours. Usually we will ask you to drop off sometime in the morning so our doctors can examine the patient in between appointments or at the time purposely reserved for admitted patients. Once the doctor is done, she will give you a call to go over the diagnosis and to give you discharge instructions.

For the safety of all animals in our care, we require that all vaccinations be up to date. Even though we make every effort to make our patients feel comfortable during visits, they may be a little uneasy about new people, new surroundings and other pets. This is one of the reasons we ask you to restrain your pet. We recommend that animals be placed on a leash or in pet carriers before entering the waiting room.

Payment Policy

We require full payment at the time that services are rendered. For your convenience, we accept Visa, MasterCard, Discover, cash and personal checks.

Pet insurance has become more prevalent and, while it doesn’t cover all your veterinary expenses, can be helpful should your pet have an unexpected injury or illness. Every company is different; it’s a good idea to visit this pet insurance review to compare policies and find the one best suited for you and your pet.

Care Credit is a service that, if you are approved, will extend you a line of credit for medical expenses. Using CareCredit, your bill can be paid over six months interest-free. Various payment plans are available. We can help you fill out the application, which is typically approved within minutes. This method of extended credit provides you the opportunity pay for services over several months.

Return Policy

Just like with a human pharmacy, products that have left our facility cannot be returned. However, opened bags of dog and cat food may be returned or exchanged because they are guaranteed by the manufacturer. 

Prescription Policy

  • Prescription Refills. Please give us as much notice as possible when refills are needed.
  • At Shiloh Veterinary Hospital we understand that there may be times in which your pet’s medications may be obtained from alternative sources other than our hospital.  We do not recommend purchasing your pet’s medications from unknown online pharmacies.   Please talk with us first before purchasing your pet’s medications from another source.  You will find our in-house pharmacy prices are very competitive with online pharmacies.  Please be aware that you pet is required by law to be examined at least once in the past year to continue to refill medications. 

When is the best time to spay or neuter my pet?

We recommend spaying or neutering every non-breeding pets, and we recommend spaying or neutering your non-breeding pet around 6 months.  This recommendation may vary based on each individual pet.  Please schedule an appointment to discuss spaying or neutering your pet with one of our veterinarians.

Vaccines

Vaccines are an important part of your pet’s health care.  Vaccines keep your pet healthy and prevent serious diseases.  We will make sure your pet avoids these serious diseases through a vaccination schedule based on your pet’s lifestyle, health, exposure to other animals in kennels and urban dog parks, your pet’s risk of preventable diseases and other individual circumstances.

How often does my pet need a Rabies vaccination?

The first Rabies shot your pet receives is good for 1 year.  Subsequent canine Rabies vaccinations immunize your pet for 1- 3 years depending upon the vaccine your dog receives.   Dogs are required by Illinois State Law to be vaccinated against Rabies.  For cats, we use feline-exclusive rabies vaccines which are good for 1 year.

What is heartworm protection and how many months should my pet be on heartworm prevention medication?

Heartworm disease is a serious disease transmitted by infected mosquitoes and, if left untreated can be fatal. Heartworm prevention is administered once a month either by pill or by topical application.  Depending on the specific product you and your veterinarian choose for your pet, heartworm prevention medication can prevent other parasite infestations including internal parasites (worms) and external parasites (fleas and ticks).  Cats can get heartworm, too.  We recommend cats taking heartworm prevention, and we will discuss your available options during cat’s feline wellness exam.  In accordance with the guidelines of the American Heartworm Society, we recommend all dogs and cats be given year round (12 months) heartworm prevention regardless of lifestyle.

Why does my dog need a blood test before purchasing heartworm prevention?

Your dog will need to be tested with a simple blood test for heartworm disease on an annual basis. Dogs could get sick (vomiting, diarrhea, and/or death) if placed on heartworm prevention when they have heartworm disease.  Even if they have been on heartworm prevention year round there is always the possibility that the product may have failed for various reasons (your pet spit out the pill, did not absorb the pill appropriately, topical medicine was not applied properly, forgot to administer medication on time, etc.) and the earlier we can treat your pet for heartworm disease the better the prognosis.  Some companies will guarantee their product providing you use the heartworm prevention year round and are performing yearly heartworm tests.  When starting heartworm prevention it is important that you perform an initial heartworm test. 

My pet never goes outside so does it really need heartworm prevention?

Yes. Heartworm disease is transmitted through the bite of a mosquito and all mosquitoes can get into houses.

Doesn’t the fecal sample test for heartworms?

No. Heartworm disease is a blood-borne disease that is transmitted through mosquitoes. A simple blood test will confirm whether or not your dog has heartworm disease.

How can I prevent fleas?

It is important to prevent fleas.  We recommend all dogs and cats be given a monthly flea preventive from April through December. Not only are they uncomfortable for your pet, fleas are also carriers of disease, such as tapeworms.  There are many medications for the treatment and prevention of fleas.  Some medications are in a combined form with the monthly heartworm medication.  Not only is this convenient, but it reduces the cost of two medications! 

Why does my pet need a dental cleaning and how often should this be done?

Many of the pets that visit us on a regular basis need professional teeth cleaning.  When bacteria irritate the gum line, the gums become inflamed in the early stages of dental disease causing gingivitis.  Left untreated, this leads to periodontal disease which causes the loss of the bone and gingival support structure of the tooth and subsequent tooth loss.  In addition, the bacteria are consistently released into the blood stream allowing for systemic infections, which can cause damage to internal organs, such as the kidneys, liver and heart.  A dental exam is a part of any physical exam at Shiloh Veterinary Hospital.

Do I need to brush my pet’s teeth at home?

Yes. Proper dental care at home is highly recommended to help maintain the oral health of your dog and cat. Home dental care for companion animals should start early, even before the adult teeth erupt.  It is best if owners brush their dogs and cats teeth frequently.  Although tooth brushing is the best method of preventing plaque, calculus, and bacterial build-up, there are many options for dental home care. Other oral home care options such as dental formulated foods, water additives, and dental treats can be considered and discussed with one of our veterinarians. 

Why does my pet need to be admitted several hours before a surgical procedure?

In preparation for the procedure, your pet will receive:

  • Pre-anesthetic exam
  • Pre-medication to easy anxiety and to smooth induction of anesthesia
  • Placement of an intravenous catheter to deliver medications and fluids that support blood pressure and organ function during anesthesia
  • In addition to the above it gives your pet a chance to acclimate to the hospital environment to make the situation less stressful.

What should I bring for my pet's hospital stay?

If your pet is on a special diet or on any medications, you should bring these with you to the hospital.

Are there any special at-home care instructions for my dog or cat before undergoing surgery?

Please do not feed your pet after 10:00 p.m. the evening before a scheduled procedure. There is no restriction on drinking water that evening, but the water bowl should be removed first thing the morning (6:00 a.m.) on the day of the procedure.  Plan to arrive at the office at the appointed time and allow 15-30 minutes for check-in procedures.

Is anesthesia safe for my pet?

At Shiloh Veterinary Hospital we take all anesth

All anesthesia has a risk. Our goal is to minimize this risk. We do this in several ways:

  • Physical Exam: Your pet will receive a thorough physical exam before anesthesia.
  • Lab work: Before every anesthetic episode, we recommend a complete blood count (CBC) and serum chemistry. The CBC will allow us to screen for signs of infection, anemia, and indications of coagulation problems. The chemistry is mainly used to screen for liver and kidney problems, which are the organs that metabolize and excrete the anesthesia. Other health problems can be detected, as well.
  • Choices of Anesthetic Agents: At SVH, we offer the most modern choices in drug choices for anesthesia. Each pet is an individual, and drugs are chosen on an individual basis, based on health, weight, and breed.
  • Intravenous Catheter: At SVH we prefer an IV catheter be in place for all surgeries. This allows easy administration of drugs to induce anesthesia, administration of fluids during surgery, and access to a vein to give emergency drugs quickly, should a problem arise during surgery.
  • Monitoring during anesthesia: Detecting a problem early is the best way to prevent more serious problems. Our advanced anesthesia monitoring devices will monitor your pet's vital signs, including heart and respiration rates, ECG, and pulse ox, during surgery. A trained assistant will be also be present to subjectively monitor your pet's anesthesia level.

What is a multi-modal approach to anesthesia?

A multi-modal approach refers to the layered administration of small amounts of different medications to achieve the desired levels of anesthesia and pain management. We administer lower doses of each individual anesthetic which generally equates to fewer side effects, complete pain relief and faster post-operative recovery.

How will you manage my pet’s pain during surgery?

At SVH, pain management is a requirement not an option. Pain is best managed if pain medications are given before the pain starts. Therefore, your pet will receive an injection for pain prior to surgery, and you will be sent home with a prescription of pain medication.

DO NOT give over-the counter pain medication without first contacting your veterinarian. While some can be given, some human medications can be fatal to our pets. Some human medications cannot be mixed with medication we commonly give to our pets.

My pet is older, is anesthesia safe?

Anesthesia in otherwise healthy, older pets is considered safe. It is important to have recommended pre-operative testing performed prior to anesthesia to check major organ function and allow us to tailor the anesthesia to any pre-existing medical conditions.;

My pet has kidney and heart disease, is anesthesia safe?

Prior to anesthesia, patients with kidney disease should be fully evaluated with blood tests, urinalysis, and possible ultrasound. Cardiology patients should also be evaluated including blood tests, chest x-rays, and echocardiogram (ultrasound of the heart).  Our veterinarians will determine based on each individual situation if it is safe for your pet to undergo anesthesia.

When my pet is having surgery, when should I expect an update on my pet?

You will receive a call from one of our veterinary assistants when your pet is in recovery from the procedure. If there are any abnormalities on pre-anesthetic exam or blood work, you will receive a call prior to the procedure in case we need to change plans.  Remember that no news is good news, and you will be contacted immediately should the need arise.  One of our veterinarians will be available at discharge to discuss the procedure and discharge instructions with you in detail, as well as answer any questions.

After surgery, when will my pet be able to go home?

Pets undergoing outpatient procedures will be ready to go by close of business the same day unless noted otherwise during the post-operative phone update.

What is the follow-up care after surgery?

For most procedures, the after care will consist of confinement for 10-14 days following surgery. This means no running, jumping, or playing. Leash walks to go outside to the bathroom is allowed for dogs. Baths should not be given. You will need to monitor the incision for redness, drainage, and swelling which could be an indication of infection. Some redness and swelling will be normal with healing. We recommend no food the night following surgery, but your pet should be able to eat and drink as normal by the next day. If your pet vomits, has diarrhea, or is not eating, please contact our office. If you notice your pet licking at the incision, your pet will need to wear an e-collar. If you do not have one, pick one up immediately. If your pet has stiches in the skin, you will need to return to our office to have them removed 10-14 days after surgery.

How do I know if my pet is in pain?

It can sometimes be difficult to tell. If you are not sure but suspect your dog or cat may be hurting, or is just not acting right, call us to have us examine your pet.  Some signs of pain are more obvious, such as limping, but some signs are more subtle and can include:  not eating, a change in behavior or normal habits, being more tired and having less energy.  Of course, these symptoms can also be caused by many problems, so early observation and action is important.

 

Answers to common questions after your pet returns home following surgery:

Appetite
Decreased appetite can occur after surgery. There are several things you can try:

  • Offer favorite foods
  • Warm the food slightly above room temperature to increase the odor and taste
  • Some pets like low fat cooked chicken, turkey or ground beef with rice.  As a bland diet, this may help entice your pet’s appetite following surgery.

If your pet’s appetite is not normal the day after surgery, or if your pet is not drinking water, vomiting, or seems lethargic, please call our office for further instruction.

Bandage, cast or splint is wet, soiled or off
If the bandage becomes soiled, damp, chewed, or chewed off, please do not re-bandage at home.  Duct tape and other items can trap moisture within the cast or bandage causing inflammation of the skin and tissues. In some cases, bandages inappropriately applied at home can even cut off the circulation to a limb!  Call us immediately if you have concerns about your pet's bandage.  Please also call us if you notice swelling of the exposed toes on the bandaged limb, which can be seen by spreading apart of the toe nails.  Confine your pet to a single room or similar small area until you can call us and we can advise you to whether the bandage needs to be replaced. After a cast or splint is first removed, it may take 1-2 weeks for your pet to become accustomed to using the leg without the splint.

Constipation, bowel movements
Difficulty having bowel movements can be expected after illness, anesthesia, or surgery. It may take a few days for the gastrointestinal system to return to normal function. Fortunately, it is not vital for your pet to pass a stool on a regular daily basis. Please call if your pet has not passed a stool within 48 hours of discharge from the hospital or appears to be straining to defecate.

Crying/whining
Although vocalizing can indicate discomfort, it can also be associated with other feelings following surgery. Often, pets vocalize due to the excitement or agitation that they feel on leaving the hospital and returning to their familiar home environment.  Some pets will also vocalize or whine as the last remaining sedative or anesthetic medications are removed from their systems, or in response to the prescribed pain medication.  If crying or whining is mild and intermittent, you may simply monitor the situation. If vocalization persists, please call us for advice. In some cases, a sedative may be prescribed or pain medication may be adjusted.

Diarrhea
Diarrhea may be seen after hospitalization. This can be caused by a change in diet but is more commonly caused by the stress of being away from home. Certain medications prescribed to your pet may also cause diarrhea. If the diarrhea is bloody, lasts longer than 12-24 hours or if your pet becomes lethargic or vomits, please contact us immediately.  You can purchase a nutritionally complete bland food from us available in cans or kibble or we can guide you in preparing a home cooked bland diet.  We do NOT recommend using any over-the-counter medication to treat the diarrhea. Please call us if there are any questions or problems.

E-collar
We rely on you to keep the E-collar on your pet. While they may not enjoy it initially, they will enjoy even less having to come back to our office for a recheck visit to repair an incision that has been chewed open or treat an infection at the surgery site. They will need to wear the collar on for an even longer period if this happens! Most pets become accustomed to the collar within one or two days and they can eat, sleep, and drink with it on. We are counting on you: please keep the E-collar on your pet.

Injury to surgical site
If for any reason you suspect that your pet has re-injured the surgical site, confine your pet and call us immediately for advice.

Medication Refills
If you have given your pet all the pain medication prescribed and you feel your pet still has discomfort, please call and we will be happy to discuss refilling the pain medication.

Pain
Despite the medications we have prescribed, some pets will still show signs of pain at home, such as restlessness or an inability to sleep, poor appetite, lameness or tenderness at the site of surgery.  Please confine your pet to limit their activity. Then call us immediately so we can dispense or prescribe additional medication or therapies as necessary to keep your pet comfortable.

Panting
This is commonly seen after surgery. It may indicate soreness but may also be due to anxiety or in reaction to the prescribed pain medication.  Please call and we can help determine whether additional pain medication is advised or if the dose needs to be adjusted.  We will be happy to recheck your pet for your peace of mind.

Seroma (fluid pocket)
In any healing surgical area, fluid produced during the healing process may accumulate and form a seroma (fluid pocket). Fortunately, this is not painful and does not impair the healing process. Eventually, the body will reabsorb the fluid so if the seroma is small, we typically will leave it alone. If it is large, we may remove the fluid with a needle and syringe or even place a drain.  If you notice a seroma developing, please call. We may wish to recheck the area to ensure there is no infection.

Shaking/trembling
This is a very common response to physiologic stress after surgery, injury, or any other health abnormality. The amount of shaking or trembling may be dramatic, but it does not always imply severe pain, cold, or distress. It may involve the entire body, or just the area of surgery.  If there are signs of pain such as restlessness, lack of appetite, or crying out, or you are concerned about what your pet is exhibiting, please call.

Urination
Some pets may urinate less after surgery or may seem to be unable to control urination. This is usually temporary and may be a side effect of medication, anesthesia drugs, or difficulty assuming "the position" to urinate. Please call if your pet has not produced urine for more than 12 hours. Many pets initially drink less after returning home, so expect less urination at first.

Vomiting
An episode or two of vomiting is occasionally seen after surgery or anesthesia. If the vomiting continues, blood is noted in the vomitus, or if your pet is not holding down any food or water, call to schedule a recheck of your pet by a veterinarian.